5 Stars

A PARTIAL HISTORY OF LOST CAUSES by Jennifer duBois, Book Review

A PARTIAL HISTORY OF LOST CAUSES by Jennifer duBois, Book Review

A Partial History of Lost Causes Synopsis In Jennifer duBois’s mesmerizing and exquisitely rendered debut novel, a long-lost letter links two disparate characters, each searching for meaning against seemingly insurmountable odds. In St. Petersburg, Russia, world chess champion Aleksandr Bezetov begins…

THE TINY WIFE by Andrew Kaufman, Review: An absolute gem

THE TINY WIFE by Andrew Kaufman, Review: An absolute gem

The Tiny Wife Synopsis A remarkable short novella, a modern fable that is weird, uplifting and romantic all at the same time – from the author of All My Friends are Superheroes. A flamboyantly-dressed man enters a bank, and proceeds to…

ANTHEM by Ayn Rand, Review: Moving anthem for individualism

ANTHEM by Ayn Rand, Review: Moving anthem for individualism

Rand’s Anthem is a short but moving exploration of the power of the words ‘we’ and ‘I’. It shows how taken to the extreme on mass each of these words can evoke singlemindness leading to oppression that could prove disastrous to mankind.

ONE DAY by David Nicholls | Book, Movie & TV Series Review: Depth & compassion

ONE DAY by David Nicholls | Book, Movie & TV Series Review: Depth & compassion

One Day by David Nicholls oozes humour, depth and compassion. Why I recommend the audiobook, consider the movie a poor substitute but love the TV series also.

Has a novel ever made you laugh and want to cry at the same time? One Day did that to me.

Nicholls forces us to fall in love with his lead characters, Emma Morley and Dexter Mayhew, as we check in with them each year on the anniversary of their first liaison. How can one not feel a connection to these characters when they think the same things we have all thought? How can one not feel empathy for these hapless individuals when we have all made similar mistakes in our own lives?

Life of Pi, Book Review: Yann Martel’s life-affirming gem

Life of Pi, Book Review: Yann Martel’s life-affirming gem

The Life of Pi novel, Yann Martel’s debut, truly deserves the accolades it has received. I was thoroughly engaged and entertained by this tale. Read my full review including some memorable book quotes below and we answer your burning question – was Life of Pi based on a true story?

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson, Review

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson, Review

The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest, the finale of Stieg Larsson’s groundbreaking Millennium Trilogy wholeheartedly deserves its place amongst the bestselling crime fiction of this decade.
The action begins swiftly, exactly where Larsson left readers in the cliffhanging ending of The Girl Who Played With Fire.

Book Review – WANTING by Richard Flanagan

Book Review – WANTING by Richard Flanagan

BOOK REVIEW Evocative. Wanting by Richard Flanagan is a story that will move even the most hardened of souls. Flanagan dares to ask the question, what is the difference between a savage and one that is civilized? This is a…

The Alchemist, Book Review: Paulo Coelho’s beguiling novel

The Alchemist, Book Review: Paulo Coelho’s beguiling novel

Santiago’s search for hidden treasure is presented as a metaphor for life.
Coelho introduces the concept of one’s Personal Legend, or destiny. Appealingly though, this destiny is not presented as something that will simply fall into one’s lap, but something one needs to strive for. Too often in this inspirational genre readers are given the impression that if we simply wish for something long enough with the purest of intentions, then that wish will come into being. This simple tale reminds us that anything worth having must be worked for and that one does not gain in life without first risking loss. We are also reminded that treasures can come in the form of both material objects and experiences.

The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson, Book Review

The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson, Book Review

Gripping. The second instalment of Stieg Larsson’s Millenium Trilogy, The Girl Who Played With Fire, is not just a worthy successor to the first, it is even better!
Why is it better? This novel is where the reader is properly introduced to the feisty heroine Lisbeth Salander.